Environmental


Terra Energy undertakes thorough environmental monitoring as part of its commitment to the local environment. This ensures any changes resulting from mining operations are quickly discovered and can be acted upon to minimise environmental impacts. Our monitoring program includes air quality monitoring (dust), noise and vibration monitoring, water monitoring (including surface and ground water), water quality, and monitoring of our impacts and aspects.

As part of our annual Environmental Management Plan renewal, we update these documents and submit them to the Mongolian Ministry of Environment and Green Development (MEGD).

We adhere to all relevant Mongolian Standards and have adopted the International Finance Corporation’s Environmental Health and Safety Performance Standards. These standards inform our Environmental Management Plan.

Our environmental monitoring program also extends into the surrounding region where we measure community water wells and water quality. The company also undertakes frequent dust, noise and vibration monitoring in the region.

Stream sampling as part of Terra’s commitment to monitoring environmental impact

Stream sampling as part of Terra’s commitment to monitoring environmental impact

Regulatory compliance

Environmental Regulations in Mongolia are very extensive as part of the Government’s commitment to protect the country’s natural resources and balance this against the requirements of national development through mining. The process is well set out and structured to ensure the Environmental Protection measures are robust and include all stakeholders.

The following are the Environmental Treaties and Conventions that have been signed and ratified by the Government of Mongolia and by extension, are applicable to the way Terra Energy conducts its business:

  • —Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage (1990 acceptance and entry into force);
  • —United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992 signature, 1993 ratification, and 1994 entry into force);
  • —Convention on Biological Diversity (1992 signature and 1993 ratification and entry into force);
  • —Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (1996 accession and entry into force);
  • —Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer (1996 accession and entry into force);
  • —Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) (1996 accession and entry into force);
  • —International Convention to Combat Desertification in those Countries Experiencing Serious Drought and/or Desertification, particularly in Africa (1994 signature and 1996 ratification and entry into force);
  • —Basel Convention on the Control of Trans boundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal (1997 accession and entry into force);
  • —RAMSAR Convention on Wetlands of International Importance especially as Waterfowl Habitat (1998 accession and entry into force);
  • —Bonn Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (1999 entry into force);
  • —Energy Charter Protocol on Energy Efficiency and related Environmental Aspects (1999 accession and 2000 entry into force);
  • —Energy Charter Treaty (1999 accession and 2000 entry into force);
  • —Amendment to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (2002 ratification and entry into force);
  • —Cartagena Protocol on Bio safety to the Convention on Biological Diversity (2003 accession and entry into force);
  • —Rotterdam Convention on the Prior Informed Consent Procedure for Certain Hazardous Chemicals and Pesticides in International Trade (1998 signature, 2001 ratification, and 2004 entry into force);
  • —Memorandum of Understanding Concerning Conservation Measures for the Siberian Crane (2004 signature and entry into force);
  • —Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (2002 signature and 2004 ratification and entry into force) Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations; and
  • Framework Convention on Climate Change (1999 accession and 2005 entry into force)

Framework for environmental impact assessment in Mongolia

Critical to the development of a mine project in Mongolia is understanding the environmental context in which it will operate. This is done through a framework of land assessment, land user assessments, baseline studies, and general and detailed Environmental Impact Assessment and annual Environmental Management and Environmental Protection Plans. The following outlines the process in Mongolia.

Environmental Management

The regulatory requirements for a mine project lead to a series of monitoring and actions plans which mitigate the potential adverse impacts of mining or require measures to ensure the company is able to rehabilitate impacted areas. BNU currently monitors dust, water quality, water well and spring levels, and water usage. Samples are taken and sent to a laboratory for analysis.

procedure1

Fig 1: Assessment Framework